Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

September 5, 2017

Another September

by Thomas Kinsella

 

Dreams fled away, this country bedroom, raw
With the touch of dawn, wrapped in a minor peace,
Hears through an open window the garden draw
Long pitch black breaths , lay bear its apple trees,
Ripe pear trees, brambles, windfall-sweethened soil,
Exhale rough sweetness against the starry slates.
Nearer the river sleeps St.Johns, all toil
Locked fast inside a dream with iron gates.
Domestic autumn, like an animal
Long used to handling by those countrymen,
Rubs her kind hide against the bedroom wall
Sensing a fragrant child come back again
– Not this half tolerated consciousness
That plants its grammar in her unyielding weather
But that unspeaking daughter, growing less
familiar where we fell asleep together.
Wakeful moth-wings blunder near a chair
Toss their light shell at the glass and go
To inhabit the living starlight,Stranded hair
Stirs on the still linen. It is as though
The black breathing that billows her sleep, her name,
Drugged under judgement, waned and – bearing daggers
And balances – down the lampless darkness they came,
Moving like women: Justice, Truth, such figures.

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NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

July 26, 2017

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

The Lines Are Still Blazing!

On the program today, Neil chats with Barbara Matuson, author of the book The Evening Stars, and the live callers.

Small farmers in Québec

July 13, 2017

9847128

 Photo : Marie-France Coallier, The Gazette

I was lucky enough to have always lived in a first floor apartment in the city of Montreal. So I’ve always have a small garden to grow some lettuce, green onions, basil, tomatoes, pepper and little more. So when someone talked to me about this article, I thought I should share and maybe it could inspire some.

This article was published in the Gazette about small Farmers in Québec, on the May 16, 2014. Today, even big stores like Loblaws and Metro are now carrying free range meat they say is raised with no antibiotics, as well as organic fruit and vegetables, albeit from beyond our borders. But the big story, in lockstep with the farm-to-table movement, is the new life on Quebec’s small farms.

In the article we are introduce to the Ferme Tourne-sol, who started with 5 students who met at McGill University and decided to farm together. They found a piece of land to rent and started their work in Les Cèdres. They started in 2005; they wanted to offer fresh and organic vegetable and fruit for the community. As Pascal Thériault , an agricultural economics expert who teaches at McGill’s MacDonald Campus in Ste-Anne de Bellevue said, “Historically, our particular program has been in place to train farmers, and we usually get sons and daughters of farmers who will themselves take over the farm. This coming year, 23 of the 48 completed applicants did not come from farms or have only a limited knowledge of agriculture.”

We are also meeting Jean-Marie Fortier (in the picture above), from Les Jardins de la Grelinette in St-Armand, who only uses hand held tools to work his field, “People are super stoked hearing that young people make a living on an acre and a half without a tractor,” he says.

The movement toward small, organic farming is so strong, Thériault says, that many farmers can’t accept more customers for their CSAs. But that doesn’t mean all new farmers will be successful.

“Jean-Martin is a great example of being able to make a lot of money,” he said. “Having a sustainable farm is cool but it has to be financially sustainable. Direct sell to consumer is more work and more trouble, and distributors won’t do business with them, since they can’t guarantee the volumes.”

I recommend you to go and check this article :

http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Appetite+organic+Quebec+small+farmers+thriving/9847124/story.html

Would you decide to make a change and become a farmer ?

When buying your vegetable, do you know where they came from ?

Are you trying to eat fresh and organic food ?

What do you think of GMO ?

 

Stephanie P.

NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

July 10, 2017

 

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

The Lines Are Blazing!

On this one, its mostly miscellaneous interviews on different subjects and something special at the end.

BLAST FROM THE PAST!

July 5, 2017

Here is an episode of McKenty Live!  with former Quebec minister of education Claude Ryan.

Originally broadcast on May 5th 1989

https://www.youtube.com/embed/UyMnG2R7JPw« >

DOES A STAY-AT-HOME VACATION MAKE ANY SENSE?

June 26, 2017

For starters a stay-at-home vacation means you don’t spend a nickel on travel or accommodation.

The experts say the key to a stay vacation is planning:

Just as you do when actually away on vacation, a start date and an end date.

Avoid working on projects around the house.

Avoid everyday routine:  Avoid the mail, e-mails and phone calls just as you do when away.

Set a stay vacation budget.

Act like a tourist in your own town.  Visit with fresh eyes places you would take visitors to visit.

Have you ever had a stay-at-home vacation?  How did it work?

Would you try one?

ARE YOU TIRED OF WAITING?

June 21, 2017

 

 

Did you know that a new survey reveals that 86 per cent of Canadians say they’ve given up on their purchases and walked out of a business after waiting too long for service.

Department stores are deemed the worst offenders with 78 per cent of customers say they’ve bailed out.

More than half have left a bank or convenience store in frustration. Two-thirds say they’ve given up on public transit and half have abandoned a medical facility.

Have you walked out of any of these places? Other places?

How long are you prepared to wait?

On average, consumers said eight minutes was enough time to wait in a grocery store and they’d give up after 15 minutes; they’d wait up to 22 minutes for public transit and 81 minutes to see a doctor before they walked out.

What is your experience waiting in these places? Other places?

How long do you think it is acceptable to wait?

Now, if you want to read how others handle this subject check out Larry Chung at IHateBadService.ca

Working together ?

May 24, 2017

Coming together is a beginning

Keeping together is a progress

Working together is success

– Henry Ford

What do you think about this quote ?  What do you think about this question of working together ?  Have you have a good experience of working together, as part of a group ?  What are the challenges ?  Did you have to overcome resistance in yourself or other people ?

BLAST FROM THE PAST!

May 18, 2017

Here is Neil on the other side of the microphone taking part with another guest for a program discussing  »learning in retirement ».

Haven’t lost his touch!!

 

 »Montreal AM Live » Originally broadcast on 01/28/93

MEMORIES OF NEIL

May 12, 2017

McKenty LiveIMGNeil and a  guess at CFCF

NEIL MCKENTY

Dec. 31, 1924 – May 12, 2012

The Lines are still blazing !

Neil’s life and work continues to inspire people on both side of the Atlantic, through new editions of his books and an ongoing blog (www.neilmckenty.com)that carries some of his radio shows at CJAD.  Neil courageous battle with bipolar and depression haven given a rise to the Neil McKenty Memorial Lecture which will be given, again this October at the Health Care Conference Canada Event.

mck020011-12-2012-3Neil and René Lévesque at CJAD 1983

08-31-2012-4

at CJAD

aislin

neil in a white suit

 

———————————————————————-Neil and Catharine McKenty on the dance floor

”Catharine, Don’t Panic”

”In the end, no matter what, Neil could always make me laugh.  I remember one particular December evening in our beloved farmhouse home in the heart of Victoria Village.  On dark nights such as this one I always made sure to place candles of all sizes on an ancient dining room table which we bought for $35 from neighbours who were moving out as we were moving in.  On this winter evening I had set a scrumptious shepherd’s pie in front of Neil so he could serve us both.  As he reached across the table to hand me my plateful, the fuzzy sleeve of his bright red dressing gown caught fire.

To my horror the flames began to run up his arm.  Neil quietly stood up, stepped out from the table, and moved steadly towards the kitchen saying calmly to me ”Catharine, don’t panic.”

I followed him out to the kitchen, picked up a big green canister of flour from the counter and threw the contents over himself.  The fire went out.  Neil returned to the meal as though nothing had happened, sitting there in his black-tinged dressing gown while I dissolved in near hysterical laughter.

Many times since, in moments of crisis, I hear those words, ”Catharine, don’t panic!”.

They have often returned to stand me in good stead.