Archive for the ‘Montreal’ Category

RADIO WAVES

March 27, 2017

 

Exchange on CJAD with Neil McKenty.

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On today’s program, Mayor Drapeau.  Did Mayor Drapeau mismanaged the Olympics.  Neil talks with Montrealers on the mayor at the time.  Enjoy!

RADIO WAVES

March 20, 2017

Exchange, with Neil McKenty.

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Neil takes another call

Montreal Symphony Orchestra Concert Hall.  Do you like classical music, have you been to the new and improved concert hall they’ve  just built in Montreal, should tax payers feed the new mayors plan. ( Drapeau then, Coderre now).

On today’s episode of Exchange, Neil touches the subject with live callers.

RADIO WAVES

March 15, 2017

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

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Neil takes another call

On this episode of ExchangeNeil interviews Canadian journalist, Charles Lynch.  With live callers as usual. 

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

March 14, 2017

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How in the world did Polly Noble, a bubbly little girl with freckles, born just outside Dromore in January 1837, live to become the subject of a biography more than a century later in Toronto.

It was on her father’s farm, an old Coach Road between Dromore and Enniskillen, that Polly spent an idyllic two years with her parents, George and Jane Noble.  Then disaster struck.  On January 6, 1839, the Big Wind rose out of the sea and swept across Ireland, wailing like a thousand banshees.  It flattened whole villages, burned down farm houses, and finally killed her father.  It changed Polly’s life forever.

Two years later, Polly’s mother, Jane, married William Fleming, the handsome widower across the road at Bridgewater Farm.  Soon Polly began to walk back and forth the mile or so to the one-room school run in Dromore by the Kildare Society.

But she also found time to plant potatoes, milk the cows, look after the goats, pull flax, chase the hens and run bare-foot in the meadows.

Then disaster struck again.  The potato crop failed and famine and typhus threatened Bridgewater Farm.  Like thousands of others the Fleming decided they must escape.

They packed what they could and traveled by horse and cart to Londonderry/Derry, drinking in their last views of the green fields and hills of Ireland.  On the 14th of May, 1847, along with four hundred and eighteen other passengers, they boarded the three-masted sailing ship Sesostris.

After an appalling voyage, during which some of the passengers, including Polly’s darling little brother and sister died, they docked at Grosse-Ile, the quarantine station on the St-Lawrence River, about an hour from Quebec.  After three years in Montreal,  where she met her future husband, Polly was now ready for her next adventure in a vast unknown land called Canada.  Her destiny would be linked with a dozen children who had called their mothers, one of them a future mayor of Toronto.

RADIO WAVES

March 13, 2017

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

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Neil takes another call

What’s on your mind?  On today’s show, a medley of different subjects being debated and discussed with live callers.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

March 8, 2017

McKenty Live!

This one is about house pets with guest Cynthia Drummond who works for the MTL SPCA, and the live callers.

RADIO WAVES

March 6, 2017

 

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

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Neil takes another call

Here is one of Neil’s daily episode of Exchange talking about Canadian psyche.

RADIO WAVES

February 23, 2017
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Neil takes another call

Exchange on CJAD with your host Neil McKenty.

This episode of Exchange is on Alliance Quebec.  A Quebec political party at the time.

Neil recounts his time on TV

February 16, 2017

After returning from Ireland in the summer of 1987, where the John Main biography had been launched at Trinity College, I was astonished to receive a telephone call from a senior program producer at CFCF television, Don McGowan, a well-known Montreal television personality in his own right. Over lunch at the garden café of the Ritz-Carlton, McGowan asked me if I would be interested in doing a live talk show on television, a sort of poor man’s Larry King Live. McGowan would provide a chauffeur-driven limousine to pick me up each morning (impressive for the neighbors) and an extensive new wardrobe (a delight for Catharine who never approved of my doing radio in a scruffy T-shirt).

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Neil on set at CFCF

Of course I jumped at the opportunity, and in September 1987, we went on air with Montreal’s first English live call-in television program, McKenty Live. Television is more cumbersome and complicated than radio, but for the next three years I had a lot of fun – the limousine with a bar, telephone and TV set in the back seat; the warmth and soft hands in the make-up room; a small, friendly staff. During the three years we had some remarkable guests: the famous sexologist, Dr. Ruth, who was so tiny she had to sit on a Montreal telephone directory; Canada’s chief negotiator, Louis Reisman, with whom I had a ferocious argument on free trade two days before the federal election; and René Lévesque, the only guest who not only smoked, but offered a cigarette to everyone in the crew. Only a week later, this man whom I liked very much, died of a heart attack. René Lévesque’s last appearance in public might well have been on McKenty Live.

Neil and a  guess at CFCF

Although I enjoyed McKenty Live and my associates on the program, Daniel Freedman, Wendy Helfenbaum and Bernie Peissel, at the end of the third season, I decided to leave the program. My reasoning was: I would be repeating programs we had already done; some of my associates were being changed; I wanted to do some more writing, perhaps a book on Catharine’s grandfather, onetime mayor of Toronto; and both Catharine and I were busy with the Benedictine Priory and meditation. So in June 1990, I left CFCF television.

from the Inside Story.

NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

February 15, 2017

Exchange on CJAD with your host Neil McKenty

The Lines Are Blazing!!

This episode is about Aislin cartoon in the Gazette with guest Terry Mosher and the live callers.

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Jean P.