Archive for the ‘McKenty Books’ Category

NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

May 11, 2017

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Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

The Lines Are Blazing!

On this one, its mostly miscellaneous interviews on different subjects and something special at the end.


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NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

May 10, 2017

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Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

The Lines Are Blazing!

On this show, Neil discusses with Clark Davey, Montreal Gazette publisher and the live callers.


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Jean P.

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

May 9, 2017

Does Gratitude Impact our Health and Happiness?

An ”overnight” trip, took days due to a series of airline ‘mishaps’.  Instead of dwelling on the negatives, author Anna Bowness-Park decided to be appreciative of all that was good along the way – resulting in unexpected pleasures!

”Gratitude shifts our thoughts from the negative aspects of life to noticing and appreciating the positive incidents, even if they are small.

I thought about this on a recent, difficult journey to the UK.  What should have been an overnight trip, took three days due to a series of airline ‘mishaps’.  Though the marathon journey was worrying – especially as I had a meeting to attend – I decided to be appreciative of all that was good along the way.  That included expressing gratitude to the airline staff who were trying to make things easier for us, the taxi driver who tried his best to find yet another hotel we were supposed to stay at, and even the cleaners in the airport.

And it made a difference.  For the most part, I remained relaxed and calm, even enjoying some humour-filled moments.  When I got to my destination, I completed my meeting with no ill-effects, even though I had about four hours of sleep in three days.  What helped?  I actually prayed for gratitude.  I wanted to ensure that my time was not wasted in anger, frustration and criticism.  A recollected phrase, written long before the current challenges of airline travel, spoke to me about the impact that gratitude or ingratitude can have on our experience and well-being.

Are we really grateful for the good already received?  Then we shall avail ourselves of the blessings we have, and thus be fitted to receive more.

How did that relate to my situation?  I noticed the little moments of kindness and goodness on this journey, and was grateful.  This opened me up to recognize and experience more goodness.  I treated others with kindness and they reciprocated.

In popular, one aspect of the experience highlights this.  During this long, drawn-out journey I made friends with a young women who was looking after a small child.  We teamed up together, looked out for one another, and in the ensuing days developed a beautiful friendship that I would not have experienced otherwise.

Gratitude allows us to move through life with more grace, affording greater rest and peace.  It opens our thoughts to notice the good all around, even in trying circumstances.  How can that be anything less than health-giving?

For many of us, Thanksgiving this year will be a time for travel, long lines and inevitable delays.  It’s a great opportunity to try out these ideas.  But whether we are travelling or not, committing to a language of gratitude for the everyday things of life opens our eyes to new possibilities and makes a huge difference to our health and happiness.”

Anna Bowness-Park, author.  Story found in Grateful News, October 2014

GOOD LUNCH WITH GREAT PEOPLE

May 5, 2017

 

Catharine writes:

Today, May 4th, I attended a packed luncheon hosted by the Irish-Canada Chamber of Commerce. Our Prime Minister and the Prime Minister of Ireland gave speeches emphasizing the strong bond between the two countries, with a firm emphasis on expanding trade embedded in a treaty with the European Union.

The speeches were met with a sustained standing ovation from approximately 500 people. A historic moment, when Canadians could reassert a certain independence from the whims floating across the border south of us.

I presented a copy of my book  Polly of Bridgewater Farm to the Irish Prime Minister, and also to Thomas Mulcair. To my great amusement, as you can see in the photo, a selfie with Mr. Mulcair, who knew Neil over many years, was the result.

I also presented a copy of Neil Mckenty Live to our Prime Minister. There on page 19 is a picture of his father about to throw out the first puck at the launch of floor hockey for the mentally challenged at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens, as part of the Canadian Special Olympics. Neil worked for three years with Red Foster, the Kennedys and Brian O’Neill of the National Hockey League to  bring those Special Olympics to Canada and there Neil is standing behind Pierre Trudeau in the picture.

Neil’s story and Polly’s story both tell of hope in times of adversity. What keeps me young at heart is sharing both these stories as widely as possible. The response to both continues to grow.

NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

May 3, 2017

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Exchange on CJAD  with host Neil McKenty.

The Lines Are Still Blazing!

What’ a on your mind?


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BLAST FROM THE PAST

May 1, 2017

 

McKenty Live with host Neil McKenty.

On today’s program, Neil talks about the environment with guest David Suzuki.

Neil interviewed about John Main

April 3, 2017

Ric Peterson talks to Neil McKenty about John Main


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The visit of H.H. The Dalai Lama to the Vendôme Priory in 1980. From left to right: Laurence Freeman, Dalai Lama, John Main.

Journalist, soldier, barrister and Benedictine monk, John Main’s spiritual odyssey was a deep seated quest for an authentic life of prayer. The door finally opened when he met an Indian swami who taught him to meditate using a mantra, only to close again when he entered the Benedictine noviciate and adopted a more traditional form of prayer.

Long after ordination in 1963, John Main discovered that the form of prayer advocated by the swami already existed within the mainstream of Western Christianity but had fallen into disuse. From then on, he was to devote his life to restoring this form of christian meditation to its rightful place within the Church. His work began with the foundation of a meditation centre at Ealing Abbey in London and led, some years later, to the foundation of the Benedictine Priory of Montreal and the establishment of a worldwide spiritual family linked through the daily practice of meditation.

Neil McKenty paints an attractive portrait of this compelling Irish monk whose teaching and writing on meditation were to transform the lives of thousands of men and women.

Cover of the new edition

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Coming soon: new edition from McKenty Books, special pre-order price $15 for one copy, $20 for two copies. To order send an email to linesarestillblazing [at] gmail.com.

7. “The Zaniest Show I Ever Did”

No one in talk radio knows for certain what will resonate with listeners. Or why. To Neil’s consternation and surprise, one of his most popular “Exchange” programs was “Driving With your Mate.” These are his crib notes for the program, which elicited comments from callers for two months running.

Did you ever get lost, really lost? How did you get unlost?

Why are male drivers reluctant to ask directions?

Are men better than women at driving? I know my own wife, Catharine, gives up as a map reader and as a navigator at least once on every trip we take.

Do you think men change personalities when they get behind the wheel?

I do most of the driving in my family. I consider myself a good driver, and I am uncomfortable with someone else behind the wheel. I wonder why that is? I don’t like driving with drivers I don’t know. It makes me nervous. I feel more comfortable behind the wheel than sitting in the passenger seat.

There is something darn funny about how a car affects people. Why do we always pack so much luggage? Going, let’s say, to Las Cruces we have enough luggage in the trunk to go on a cruise around the world on the Queen Mary. Why do we need so much luggage?

Catharine’s reply:

The darling man was directionally challenged, Known to go through the occasional stop sign or red light unless the navigator, me, could stop him. Never a dull moment! The luggage, on the other hand, was mostly mine, and never ceased to amaze him. Can you believe we made it?

Click below to listen to Driving with your mate.

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RADIO WAVES

March 27, 2017

 

Exchange on CJAD with Neil McKenty.

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On today’s program, Mayor Drapeau.  Did Mayor Drapeau mismanaged the Olympics.  Neil talks with Montrealers on the mayor at the time.  Enjoy!

RADIO WAVES

March 15, 2017

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

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Neil takes another call

On this episode of ExchangeNeil interviews Canadian journalist, Charles Lynch.  With live callers as usual. 

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

March 14, 2017

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How in the world did Polly Noble, a bubbly little girl with freckles, born just outside Dromore in January 1837, live to become the subject of a biography more than a century later in Toronto.

It was on her father’s farm, an old Coach Road between Dromore and Enniskillen, that Polly spent an idyllic two years with her parents, George and Jane Noble.  Then disaster struck.  On January 6, 1839, the Big Wind rose out of the sea and swept across Ireland, wailing like a thousand banshees.  It flattened whole villages, burned down farm houses, and finally killed her father.  It changed Polly’s life forever.

Two years later, Polly’s mother, Jane, married William Fleming, the handsome widower across the road at Bridgewater Farm.  Soon Polly began to walk back and forth the mile or so to the one-room school run in Dromore by the Kildare Society.

But she also found time to plant potatoes, milk the cows, look after the goats, pull flax, chase the hens and run bare-foot in the meadows.

Then disaster struck again.  The potato crop failed and famine and typhus threatened Bridgewater Farm.  Like thousands of others the Fleming decided they must escape.

They packed what they could and traveled by horse and cart to Londonderry/Derry, drinking in their last views of the green fields and hills of Ireland.  On the 14th of May, 1847, along with four hundred and eighteen other passengers, they boarded the three-masted sailing ship Sesostris.

After an appalling voyage, during which some of the passengers, including Polly’s darling little brother and sister died, they docked at Grosse-Ile, the quarantine station on the St-Lawrence River, about an hour from Quebec.  After three years in Montreal,  where she met her future husband, Polly was now ready for her next adventure in a vast unknown land called Canada.  Her destiny would be linked with a dozen children who had called their mothers, one of them a future mayor of Toronto.