Archive for the ‘current events’ Category

What’s on your mind? Victoria Day, Dollard Day or Empire Day and much much more

May 22, 2017

What’s on your mind? on Exchange. Discussion of various subjects, including Montreal and Ottawa conference of the United Church and the ordination of homosexuals.


https://neilmckentyweblog2.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/whats-on-your-mind.mp3

BLAST FROM THE PAST

May 15, 2017

McKenty Live.

On today’s program, Neil talks about train transportation with Transport 2000 director Guy Chartrand. And the live callers.

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY TO ONE AND ALL

May 14, 2017

 

 

I can scarcely believe the privilege it is for me to see this film after all these years.

There is my beloved Mum serenely happy on her wedding day, July 25, 1929. There is my dad in contented attendance. From what people tell me, Dad was simply an amazing human being. On my desk I have a picture of him at his graduation from McMaster University, Toronto, Canada. His stated aim was – ‘‘to sail beyond the sunrise’’. And indeed he did.

He and his brothers started an orphanage in India, in the early 1920s. Dad went around to the mill owners asking for jobs for the orphans. He and his brothers used to pray all night for the food and supplies they needed. As he told my mother, the next morning there would be a knock at the door, and there would be someone with a basketful. He also told her that the first time he laid eyes on her, when he was giving a talk at the Christian Mission Alliance College in Nyack, New York, he went back to his room, got down on his knees and prayed ‘Lord, give me a chance to meet this woman or take her out of my mind.’ A few minutes later, there was a knock on the door. There was my mother holding in her hand an invitation to Dr. Turnbull to speak at a gathering in Toronto. The letter was signed by my beloved granny, Lydia Orford Fleming. You can see her in the film with her peaked black hat.

Needless to say, Dr. Turnbull found many an occasion to come to Toronto for speaking engagements. He had spoken on platforms across Canada and the U.S. and was known as the dress code of the Alliance. When he proposed, my grandmother was in total shock. Her daughter Queenie, as she was known, (born in Queen Victoria’s Jubilee year, 1897), was a rebel who wanted to wear bloomers on Sunday of all things, and had begged her mother to take her to China with her where she stayed for two years with her missionary sister Stella and brother-in-law Murdoch Mackenzie.

Granny arranged for a quiet wedding on Donlands farm, no white dress or big wedding for this rebel daughter. A choice that obviously suited this happy couple. There is Uncle Murdoch with his white beard welcoming the guests as they arrive by car. He is just back from China where he walked on foot among a people he loved for 30 years.

I first saw this film just about a year ago when Jean P. found it among a box of assorted tapes including some of Neil’s radio tapes. Interestingly, Dad was also a radio broadcaster. He had walked on foot in South America for many years, looking for locations for missions. Then he found a radio station on a Russian ship and brought it back to New York, where it allowed him and others to broadcast a message of love and hope to people that needed both.

The night of Mother’s Day 1930, he was being driven by one of his students back to Nyack from a broadcasting session in New York to be with my Mum who was four months pregnant with me. It was a dark night. The car turned a corner, hit a pileup of sand and skewered into a ditch, smashing up against a stonewall. Dad, asleep in the back seat, was killed instantly.

Granny was staying with my mother and came quietly in the night to tell her the news. Since Dad had little money in the bank, my mother had no other choice but to sell the home they had just bought on campus in Nyack. Then she packed up her bags and returned to Donlands to live with her mother and two older sisters. Just four years ago, I read for the first time a letter she wrote to her brother, Goldie, “I am determined not to go under. I feel a spiritual strength being given. I am grateful beyond measure.’’

The night before Neil’s funeral, I entered his now empty room and was about to break down completely. Those words ‘’Grateful beyond measure’’ floated into my consciousness. It carried me through the next days and weeks. At the funeral a friend of Neil’s and mine, Delores Kumps, came up to me and said, “Catharine, I had the most amazing dream last night. There was Neil, large as life, and he said to me, “Delores, be happy!” I knew it was a message for me as well. I can just hear Mum and Dad cheering.

Neil could always make me laugh. Never will I forget the time the red sleeve of his dressing gown caught fire during our supper. To read the full story, look on the blog two days ago or at the end of the book put together by our friend Alan Hustak. Neil McKenty Live! 

BLAST FROM THE PAST

May 1, 2017

 

McKenty Live with host Neil McKenty.

On today’s program, Neil talks about the environment with guest David Suzuki.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

April 10, 2017

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McKenty Live with host Neil McKenty.

On this episode of McKenty Live, Neil talks about alcoholism, especially children of alcoholics, with guests: Ann Denis and Heather Webster.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

April 6, 2017

McKenty Live.

On today’s program, Neil talks about train transportation with Transport 2000 director Guy Chartrand. And the live callers.

NEIL’ RADIO SHOW

April 5, 2017

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Neil takes another call

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

On the show today, Neil is discussing  looks.  Is it a factor in today’s world.  With the live callers.


https://neilmckentyweblog2.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/good-looking.wav

Catharine asks: What do you think Donald Trump would say?

Jean P.

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

March 28, 2017

Are Books Dead?

 

This question about the future of reading arises now because of an essay by Scottish fiction writer Ewan Morrison entitled “Are books dead and can authors survive?”

Morrison goes on to explain: “”E-books and e-publishing will mean the end of the ‘writer’ as  a profession.  He argues that every information stream that has become digitized has inexorably slid toward free no-charge access. We’ve seen it happen with music, we’ve seen it happen with movies, and even with long-distance telephone calls.

In other words, the public now demands its media to be free.

I must admit in my own case, I read fewer and fewer books.  Instead I read upwards of half a dozen newspapers a day including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Montreal Gazette, the Globe and Mail and the Irish Times.  I read the last to keep abreast of the dreadful Catholic sex abuse crisis in Ireland.

However, I do belong to a book club.  We meet once a month in each other’s home, have a lively discussion and enjoy refreshments.  Our last book was a biography of  Pierre Trudeau.  Our next book will be a biography of Lucy Maude Montgomery.

What was the last book you read?  Are you reading anything now?

Is reading in decline?

Are books dead?

What do you think?

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

March 21, 2017

Because spring has arrived, here is a poem translated to English from the Irish language.

Anois teacht an tEarraigh

Spring is now coming

Now with the springtime
The days will grow longer
And after St. Bride’s day’
My sail I’ll let go
I put my mind to it,
And I never will linger
Till I find myself back
In the County Mayo.

In Clare of Morris family
I will be the first night
and in the Wall on the side below it
I will begin to drink
to Maghs Woods I shall go
until I shall make a months visit there
two miles close
to the Mouth of the Big Ford.

I swear
that my heart rises up
as the wind rises up
or as the fog lifts
when I think about Ceara
or about Gaileang on the lower side of it
about Sceathach an Mhíle
or about the plains of Mayo.

Cill Liadain is the town
where everything grows
there are blackberries and raspberries there
and every sort of fruit
and were I to be standing
in the center of my people
age would depart from me
and I would be again young.

There is always wheat and oats
growing barley and flax there
rye in branch there
flower-bread and meat
the folks who make moonshine
without a licence selling it there
the pride of the country
playing and drinking.

There is sowing and plowing
and fertilizing without manure
and it’s many the thing there
of which I have not yet spoken
kilns and mills
working without rest there
with hardly any talk about a pennys rent
or about nothing of that sort.

 

 

Written by the famous Irish language poet, Antaine Ó Raifteirí.

RADIO WAVES

March 20, 2017

Exchange, with Neil McKenty.

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Neil takes another call

Montreal Symphony Orchestra Concert Hall.  Do you like classical music, have you been to the new and improved concert hall they’ve  just built in Montreal, should tax payers feed the new mayors plan. ( Drapeau then, Coderre now).

On today’s episode of Exchange, Neil touches the subject with live callers.