TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

 

 

Catharine writes:

 

Today, Friday June 16 is Bloomsday, named in honour of James Joyce’s hero.  I was hurrying out of the Manoir Westmount to attend a reading of ”Ulysses” by Joyce, at the Westmount Library.  This novel, which I had never attempted to read, has been translated in many languages, and is considered perhaps the finest work of its kind in the 20th century.

As I walked away from our front door, I caught sight of a small bed of white flowers, their petals glistening from the rain that had just stopped; they exuded joy.  I stopped for a moment and suddenly I was back in my grandmother’s garden at Donlands Farm on the edge of Don Mills Road, Toronto.  I had just been scolded for some minor misdemeanour by a well meaning but stern aunt.  I was four years old.  I crouched by my favourite stone, thrown up centuries by a volcano.   The sun had melted the snow around part of the rock.  There in the warm brown earth was a single blue flower.

I had the strongest feeling that small flower was trying to send me a message.  I couldn’t quite decipher its meaning.  Years later, I thought, that flower was saying ”Bloom for the day.”  Now here I was on Bloomsday, 2017, and these small white flowers were nodding the same message.

I also attended an absolutely outstanding lecture by Prof. Micheal Kenneally about Jane Joyce’s “Ulysses”.  For many of us there we decided we could dare to approch the complexity of this book.  The book may, however, have to wait until next winter, since Montreal in summer is so captivating, with its flowers and trees and strolling musicians.  I am told Westmount Library has 30 books just about trees.  Which reminds me … but that’s another story.  

If there is that much to say about trees, what could be said about the lives of each of us?  The entire book ”Ulysses” is almost just one day in the life of Bloom.  (Perhaps I won’t wait until winter to start.)

 

 

3 Comments »

  1. 1
    Marguerite Van Die Says:

    What a nice story and thought with which to start the day, Catharine!
    Thank you.
    Marguerite
    Sent from my iPad
    Marguerite Van Die
    Professor emerita of history and religion
    Queen’s University, Kingston ON Canada
    Home address: 60 Alwington Ave.,
    Kingston, ON. K7L 4R3
    613-546-0826

  2. 2
    snowfallsnoopy Says:

    Thank you Marguerite. ☺

  3. 3
    snowfallsnoopy Says:

    Catharine says: Thank you one and all, I appreciate this way of communication.


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