RADIO TALK SHOW

January 17, 2018

 

Exchange

Here is one of the many episode of Exchange, Neil’s radio talk show on CJAD.  A two hour show that he hosted from 1977 to 1985 to go pursue other interests.

This one was on dirty politics or hovering around that.

Enjoy!




* Adjust your volume

 

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

January 16, 2018

The Other Key

An Inspector Julian Main Mystery

otherkeycover

 

 

A glimpse.

It was January 4, 2003, when Inspector Julian Main was jolted from a deep sleep by his telephone ringing, like a warning.  Groggily, he looked at his watch.  2:15.  his mouth felt dry and rancid like sour wine.  ”Commander Durocher here, Inspector.  I’ve just been informed that Louise Branson, the wealthy socialite, has been murdered in her home at 76 Forden Road in Westmount.  I want you to take charge of the case and I think you should get over there right away.”

For the next two months, Inspector Main, Homicide Division, Montreal Police, tracked the killer like a leopard stalking a gazelle.  The hunt took to London, where he had been attached to Scotland Yard, and to Dublin, where his sister had been sexually assaulted.  In the end it brought him back to Montreal where he and his sidekick, the gum chewing Detective Roy Marchand, uncover the other key.

 

 

Get your copy here:bookstore

 

 

Jean P.

 

A winter’s query

January 15, 2018

What is your most memorable experience of winter?

If you live in the eastern part of North America- Canada how do you cope with the severe cold? Were you affected by thawing and freezing as Montreal was?

Are you a skier or snowboarder?

If you are a snowboarder why did you choose that sport?

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

January 9, 2018

 

The Senior Times

Pit Stop by Neil McKenty

On the Shrivers, the Special Olympics and floor hockey.

I was enjoying a winter holiday in Palm Spins, California, when it was announced that Sargent Shriver gad died.  I met Shriver, married to President John Kennedy’s sister Eunice, in the early 70’s.  I’ll come back to that in a moment.

Mr. Shriver was the founding director of the Peace Corps, the signature success of Kennedy’s New Frontier.  He directed Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty, founded Head Start, created the Jobs Corp and Legal Services for the Poor.

He served as President of the Special Olympics, which was founded by his wife.

Writing in the New York Times, Bob Herbert said that ”Mr. Shriver affected more people in a positive way than any American since Franklin Delano Roosevelt.”

When I met Mr. Shriver in 1971, he struck me as an enormously enthusiastic and energetic man.  I met him to discuss an award the Kennedys were making to Jean Vanier, the son of the former governor-general.  Mr. Vanier was being honoured by the Kennedys for his work with the mentally challenged.

My boss at the time, the Toronto philanthropist and sportsman Harry ”Red” Foster, thought it would be appropriate if Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau wrote a short statement to be delivered at the awards ceremony in Washington.

I called Mr. Trudeau’s office and he agreed to send a short statement to honour Vanier.  There was, however, one condition: The statement would be in both English and French and must be read that way.

I explained Mr. Trudeau’s condition to Mr. Shriver and he readily agreed to find someone who would be able to handle the French.

At the event, however, somebody dropped the ball.  To my exasperation, the statement did not get read in French.

I expressed my anger to Mr. Shriver.  He was upset as I was and apologized profusely.

As this was playing out, we were negotiating with Mr. Shirver’s wife, Eunice, for Canada to play a larger role in the Special Olympics.  We had a Canadian Special Olympics at Exhibition Park in Toronto and we had been invited to join the Kennedys for the first international Special Olympics in Chicago.

One of the most successful elements of our own Olympics was floor hockey.  We had convinced the National Hockey League to get behind this project and we were eager that Mrs. Shriver accept floor hockey into the American Special Olympics.

To that end, I had several meetings with Mrs. Shriver in Washington.

What a though lady she turned out to be-though in the sense she knew what she wanted and used any means to get there.  Smart, too.

I was not the only person who thought if Mrs. Shriver had been born later she might well have become the first female president of the United States.

She questioned me carefully about the suitability of floor hockey for the Special Olympics program.

I am writing this wile still in Palm Springs.  While here, I’ve talked to a number of Americans about the Obama presidency.

Most people seem all for it or all against it.  There is no middle ground.  As one of the naysayers put it: ”My husband had a job under George Bush and he lost his job under Obama.”

My own view is unchanged.  If the unemployment rate comes down one full point or more, Obama will win a second term fairly easily.  I mean, who is likely to beat him?  Michelle Bachmann, the poor person’s Sarah Palin?

Published in February 2011.

NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

January 8, 2018

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

The Lines Are Blazing!

Neil is asking about US President Reagan.  With the live callers.

Jean P.

NEIL’S RADIO SHOW

January 4, 2018

 

Exchange on CJAD with Neil McKenty

 

On today, Dr. Art Mollen with Neil and the live callers.

 

VINTAGE RADIO SHOW

December 20, 2017

Exchange on CJAD with host Neil McKenty.

On this episode of Exchange, Neil talks with a former Russian military officer and asks the question: Should we be worry of the Soviet Union?

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

December 19, 2017

 

 

Pay It Forward

By Jon M. Nelson

 

In the midst of battle
The war rages on.
The bullets were flying
As the peace was withdrawn.

As I dove in the foxhole
To avoid the shells
I thought to myself,
“I’m in the middle of hell”.

As I regained composure
I saw on the ground
An enemy soldier
That was hit by a round.

When I looked at the soldier
I saw in his face,
The fear of a child
That was lost, and out of place.

I reached out my hand
To show I was a friend.
I tried to give him peace
For my enemy was at his end.

The soldier began to speak
I didn’t know what he was saying.
Although I didn’t know his language
I knew that he was praying.

His wound was very fatal
I knew he would not live
Then he reached out to me
As if to say “forgive? ”

Then he went with God
Or Allah if he preferred.
So I let him rest in peace
For that’s what he deserved.

The bombing then receded
And I had to continue on
Moving through the night,
Until the early dawn.

As I tell this story
No one believes it’s true,
But if two enemies can find peace
Maybe we can too.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

December 18, 2017

Here is Neil on the other side of the microphoneisd

interviewed for his biography of John Main.

Two short clips, the first was for the show

 » Take A Brake  » on CFTV aired on January 29th,

1987 and the second one was for  » Midday  »

on CBC aired on April 17th, 1987.

Enjoy!

TUESDAY WRITING CONVERSATION

December 12, 2017

 

 

Hero

by Kevin Higgins

 

The day you fall, bawling into the world
in a village northeast of Salisbury;
in faraway Florida, Sidney Poitier is busy

 

being one day old. In Moscow heavily scarved
women mark the anniversary:
Lenin – One Month Dead Today.

 

Your two older brothers soon join him.
And your father, Gabriel, scarpers.
You are ten years old. It is nineteen thirty four

 

and all down to you. Mission schools,
then university. You are a teacher.
Your only son dies of cerebral malaria.

 

For subversive speech,
you are under arrest. Ten years.
You study law. The Party

 

chooses you. Rocket launchers
and Chairman Mao. You look in the mirror
one morning and see: His Excellency Comrade President.

 

Your name on the lips of a continent.
In the final act you start gifting
farms the white man stole

 

to your friends. One for everyone
in the audience. As the supermarket shelves empty,
your life fills up with dead people.

 

The country may be living on Styrofoam and grass
but will sing your name
one last time. The air fat with laughter

 

as you step into the TV to say
“We don’t cheat; but on the other side…
all sorts of irregularities.”

 

A foreign journalist is arrested
on the tenth floor
of a hotel near the airport.

 

Silence,
but for the sound of an occasional dog barking
on Samora Machel Avenue.

 

Outside your office the sign:
Mugabe is right. It is two thousand and eight
and all down to you.

 

 

from Frightening New Furniture (Salmon Poetry, 2010)