Where The Roads Come Together

Verse

None of us is born the same
We don’t know why; it’s the way we came
Ev’ry heart beats a little diff’rently
Each soul is free to find its way
Like a river that winds its way to the sea
For life is a journey
and there are many roads beneath the sky,
And there are many good people
Who don’t see eye to eye

Verse

Not ev’ry man can sing your tune;
From where he stands there’s another view.
With ev’ry turn we’re learnin’ more
And perhaps we’ll find
That the walls we build are only, are only in the mind.

First Refrain in F

There are many roads to go
And they go by many names.
They don’t all go the same way
But they get there all the same
And I have a feelin’ that we’ll meet some day
Where the roads come together, up the way

Repeat Refrain in G all of us:

There are many roads to go
And they go by many names.
They don’t all go the same way
But they get there all the same
And I have  a feelin’ that we’ll meet up some day
Where the roads come together, up the way.
And I have a feelin’ that we’ll meet some day
Where the roads come together, up the way,
Up the way, up the way.

….

This past week I attended a celebration of the life of an old and dear friend, Barbara von Teuber. She and I first met when we were volunteers in post-war Europe. More recently, Neil and I had some wonderful visits with her and her husband Jerry, our mutual friend John Wood, and Clare Hallward.

This was Barbara’s favourite song from Up with People. It was written by Herbie Allen, the founding musical director of Up With People, and Paul Colwell, one of the three Holywood brothers who played around the world in some of the most dangerous and challenging situations, bringing hope to thousands.

If you want to know more about this amazing story you can google ‘Song for the World.com’. Author Frank McGee has written a superb book of that title. Also more music is available from the Up with People website.

Barbara von Teuber’s life was a story in itself. From birth she had an eye defect, but you would never know it. Her father was John Riffe. He worked as a coal miner in Kentucky. Because of the poor conditions, he and the other miners founded a union. Later he became vice-president of the CIO (Coalition of Industrial Organisations). Barbara inherited the feisty spirit of her Dad and the gentleness of her mother Rose, who worked as a telephone operator.

In these last years and months, Barbara fought cancer and COPD. I had two memorable lunches in early January with her and Jerry in Phoenix. We laughed a lot and shared stories. It was her last public visit.

I have a strong feeling that we’ll meet someday.

1 Comment »

  1. 1
    Heidi Gulatee Says:

    There is nothing better than good friends.


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