The Other Key

November 22, 2014

Neil’s detective novel – The Other Key.

Excerpt:

It was January 4, 2003, when Inspector Julian Main was jolted from a deep sleep by his telephone ringing, like a warning. Groggily, he looked at his watch. 2:15. His mouth felt dry and rancid like sour wine. “Commander Durocher, here, Inspector. I’ve just been informed that Louise Branson, the wealthy socialite, has been murdered in her home at 76 Forden Road in Westmount. I want you to take charge of the case and I think you should get over there right away.”
For the next two months, Inspector Main, Homicide Division, Montreal Police, tracked the killer like a leopard stalking a gazelle. The hunt took him to London, where he had been attached to Scotland Yard, and to Dublin, where his sister had been sexually assaulted. In the end it brought him back to Montreal where he and his sidekick, the gum chewing Detective Roy Marchand, uncover the other key.

 

Availability:
Ebook on Amazon, click  here.

Forthcoming book about Neil

November 16, 2014

Forthcoming book about Neil and his life is to be called McKenty Live: The Lines Are Still Blazing. It will be available in time for Christmas. You will be able to order from this website.

Neil_McKenty_Live_cover

2 reports from Israel – RADIO

November 14, 2014

bluemoosebicycle:

From a trip to Israel in the 1980’s some news reports.

Originally posted on Exchange:

View original

Plains of Abraham

November 10, 2014
Catharine writes:

On one of our frequent visits to Quebec City, Neil and I spent a couple of hours in the gorgeous Musée National des Beaux-Arts right there one the Plains of Abraham. We were discussing plans for lunch at one of our favourite restaurants nearby.
A small boy, aged 9, came up to us, and said clearly and firmly, ‘Mr. McKenty, I recognise your voice waves, may I introduce my parents?”.

Details of the conversation that followed are gone from memory.  But I remember the tone and inflection of that boy’s voice as if it were yesterday. Neil was exactly that age when he won his first oratorical contest in his home village of Hastings, Ontario. You’ll see the story that Neil wrote for that in the new book about Neil that is coming out soon.

SHOULD CIGARETTES BE BANNED?

November 7, 2014

bluemoosebicycle:

A blog posting from 2012 which got a big response!

Originally posted on Exchange:

Today is the  first day of Quebec-Tobacco-Free Week.  As of now fewer Quebeckers are trying to quit smoking.  And get this:  28 Quebeckers a day die from smoking.

Now consider the world scene: six  trillion cigarettes are sold a year  – an all-time high.  Six  million people die each year from smoking – more than from AIDS, malaria and traffic accidents combined.

Professor Robert Proctor is coming out with a new book in which he advocates banning cigarettes.  Education he says is not enough.  “Tobacco control policy too often centres on educating the public, when it should be focused on fixing or eliminating the product.

Professor Proctor wants two things to ha ppen right away: the nicotine in cigarettes should be limited to a level at which they would cease to be addictive.  Smokers who want to quit would find it easier to do so.

Secondly, regulators should require that cigarette…

View original 126 more words

Happy Birthday Jean! w. Writing of the Inside Story

November 5, 2014

Happy Birthday Jean!

Catharine writes:

Well do I remember the way that Jean Plourde helped my husband Neil solve various computer related problems.

Often I would see Jean sitting cross-legged on the floor, totally absorbed in the task and the conversation. Jean wrote ‘it’s amazing how two people like myself and Neil – who came from very different backgrounds – french/english – young man/someone Neil’s age – could come together and have discussions and debates about any and every subject.

‘When I met Neil I didn’t make the connection with the man I saw on his TV show. But only a few months after that I realised his was the face I used to see in my living room when I was a young teenager (Neil had grown a beard). One day he said ‘I have a blog’. I was so impressed that he continued to reach people with his great pen.

Il continu de toucher les gens avec sa belle plume.”

The writing of ‘The Inside Story’

McKENTY LIVE AND WARM

by Jeanette Paul

When an autobiography’s subtitle tells you the author has been a priest, and its first few pages foreshadow alcoholism, forbidden sex and suicide, would it really surprise you if, a little further along between the bookcovers, you were to come across sermonising, sensationalism, or a numbing downer? From a broadcaster per se (one you scarcely knew in person), would you not suspect, a smidgen, that the page might turn soon into something of an ego trip?

THE INSIDE STORY takes few, if any, forays into the land of writing-sin temptations alluded to above. Because Neil McKenty is a man honest with himself, this courageous tell-all never strips him of his dignity. Nor do his revelations regarding others seek to stir up scandal The generous glimpse we get of Jesuit rites of passage, for instance, fascinates.

Skilfully crafted, The Inside Story speaks openly and even optimistically, of a life-long struggle with recurring bouts of depression. If I’d had a say, the book’s subtitle would not have been Journey of a former Jesuit priest and talk show host towards self-discovery. It would be instead In Praise of Depression.

It’s not just that “it took depression,” in Neil’s own words, “to get me to deal with fundamental fears/’ It was only after an episode of major clinical depression four years ago, he stated matter-of-factly. that “it occurred to me I might have something to say which might help other people.”

Help other people Neil has, according to rewarding feedback already received from readers. (Since publication in 1997, the book has appeared on local bestseller lists.) Even though its genre may be Memoir, or Autobiography, the importance of The Inside Story, to my mind, is more in the nature of Self-help, Some might say Spirituality.

And the questions we asked Neil at our WARM meeting February 11th bore testimony to that; many were posed with a seeking-personal-guidance slant. Not that our guest speaker didn’t do excellence in answer to queries more directly related to his topic, Writing Biography & Autobiography, too.

Neil pointed out that the trouble with most people who want to write is that they have nothing to say. As a university student, he knew he wanted to write, having gotten a taste of it already as a stringer for The Peterborough Examiner (under editor Robertson Davies), When he confided this desire to a wise Jesuit mentor, he was counselled: “then take something with content.”

This sage advice steered young Neil away from the usual writerly likes of English lit courses, and led to a History thesis which became the nub of his first book; a biography entitled Mitch Hepburn. (For those unfamiliar with Ontario history, Hepburn was a flamboyant 1930’s premier.) Neil McKenty later wrote one more biography (In the Stillness Dancing: The Journey of John Main) about the founder of a Montreal Christian meditation centre, today Unitas.

But now, in his seventies, when he finally did have something to say about himself. Neil’s problem suddenly became how to go about saying it- An elusive muse eventually vested upon him inspiration of the simplest sort: “just tell it like a story.”

It’s a good thing Neil possesses fine faculties for linear thinking and a marvellous memory, given that he never kept a journal. He just, as he says went with what was in my head – I figured it would be the most important.”

It’s also a plus that, as he confides with pride, “my wife is a very good critic,” since “I need reactions right away.” Never writing for more than four or five hours a day, he finished the first draft of his book “in two months flat”

And it didn’t hurt either that Neil doesn’t give up easily. Manuscript completed, he mailed a cover letter, a synopsis, and “a couple sample pages” to prominent Canadian publishers. Response varied from nil to No. He then mailed again, to publishers slightly less prominent. Ditto… 40 mailings all told.

Neil lauded the personal attention given him by the small publisher Shoreline, in nearby Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue. as well as the professionalism and speed with which his book was produced.

The drawback with a smaller press, he answered frankly when asked about publicity, is that they do not have the big bucks. “Anyone who wants to write a book today but who doesn’t want to promote themselves,” he said, ’’might as well forget it”

Not everyone has the same “public persona” promotional advantage that Neil does as CJAD radio’s former (and first) Exchange talk show host, and later, TV’s McKenty Live. But then again, it’s not everyone who could have made a capacity-crowd WARM meeting so memorable, (Guests from Canadian Authors and McGill ILR joined us also.)

’”Wasn’t Neil McKenty a great speaker?” penned one member in his notepad afterwards. “I thought he gave a wonderful talk.” With a quick nod, another member summed up her evening succinctly: “What a nice man!” All I can add to that is Amen. +

Originally published in Warm Times 1998

Happy Birthday Jean!

November 4, 2014

Catharine writes:

Well do I remember the way that Jean Plourde helped my husband Neil solve various computer related problems.

Often I would see Jean sitting cross-legged on the floor, totally absorbed in the task and the conversation. Jean wrote ‘it’s amazing how two people like myself and Neil – who came from very different backgrounds – french/english – young man/someone Neil’s age – could come together and have discussions and debates about any and every subject.

‘When I met Neil I didn’t make the connection with the man I saw on his TV show. But only a few months after that I realised his was the face I used to see in my living room when I was a young teenager (Neil had grown a beard). One day he said ‘I have a blog’. I was so impressed that he continued to reach people with his great pen.

Il continu de toucher les gens avec sa belle plume.”

Network news – audio – Picture gallery

November 2, 2014

Click below to hear network news discussed on Exchange

Housework – radio show

October 29, 2014

Click below to hear a 1980’s episode where housework is discussed.

All about radio

October 25, 2014

Click below to listen to an episode of Exchange where radio is discussed.

 

aislin

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